Newsroom

Sep 29 2016
Media Inquiries

Daniela Zuin
Director of Marketing
daniela.zuin@ipsoft.com
US: +1 212 708 5521
UK: +44 (0) 7917 678 709

Analyst Inquiries

Rob Petrucelli
Director of Analyst Relations
robert.petrucelli@ipsoft.com
US: +1 212 708 5518

Press Releases

IPsoft and Deloitte Expedite a New Paradigm for the IT Organization Centered on Autonomic and..


NEW YORK, July 18, 2016 — IPsoft and Deloitte Consulting LLP today announced an alliance that will bring together Deloitte’s leading consulting services and IPsoft’s industry-leading autonomic and cognitive solutions to optimize client operations and enable business growth at scale. By developing go-to-market strategies and consulting around IPsoft’s autonomic and cognitive solutions — IPcenter and Amelia — this alliance between IPsoft and Deloitte will establish industry-focused solutions that resolve known IT pain points for clients in an accelerated implementation timeline. “Deloitte is focused on bringing an..

IPsoft and Deloitte Expedite a New Paradigm for the IT Organization Centered on Autonomic and Cognitive Technologies


NEW YORK, July 18, 2016 — IPsoft and Deloitte Consulting LLP today announced an alliance that will bring together Deloitte’s leading consulting services and IPsoft’s industry-leading autonomic and cognitive solutions to optimize client operations and enable business growth at scale. By developing go-to-market strategies and consulting around IPsoft’s autonomic and cognitive solutions — IPcenter and Amelia — this alliance between IPsoft and Deloitte will establish industry-focused solutions that resolve known IT pain points for clients in an accelerated implementation timeline. “Deloitte is focused on bringing an issues-driven approach when tackling business challenges,” said Ranjit Bawa, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, and Deloitte cloud and infrastructure leader. “By collaborating with IPsoft, we’re building solutions to solve real client issues and create new opportunities for cost savings and operating efficiencies. The industry is at a great inflection point in autonomics — and together, we’re able to bring our deep-sector knowledge and IPsoft’s innovative solutions to the forefront.” “Currently, the market lacks expertise in advanced automation. The role of the world’s most trusted consultancies is critical in ensuring enterprises translate the potential of autonomic and cognitive technology into business results,” said Chetan Dube, president and CEO, IPsoft. “Deloitte understands the value of advanced autonomic and cognitive solutions in delivering end-to-end digital services that help clients differentiate themselves in hotly contested global markets. By combining our market leading technology with Deloitte’s intimate knowledge of their clients’ businesses, we can reinvent how an enterprise’s IT operations work closer than ever to the business to deliver tangible benefits. CEOs demand quick returns and those who embrace a digital-labor-first strategy will enjoy an exponential competitive edge.” The alliance builds on a solid track record of collaboration between the two organizations and capitalizes on the exploding demand for automation solutions. Research shows that self-learning automation solutions will be a “top 5” investment priority for more than 30 percent of CIOs by 2020,1 fueling market growth for robotic automation at a CAGR 60.5 percent.2 This interest in investment is set against a backdrop of growing pressure to increase the 16% of global IT budgets dedicated to business innovation and reduce the 57% of spending on day to day IT operations.3 IPcenter, IPsoft’s autonomic IT management platform, for core automation is designed to provide 30% efficiencies within 90 days while reducing mean time to resolution by more than 60%. The company’s innovative cognitive agent, Amelia, is in the early stages of being deployed in a wide range of roles including IT service desk agent for a bank, customer services agent for a local authority, and invoicing query agent for an oil and gas company. 1 Gartner Predicts 2016: Smart Machines 2 Transparency Market Research “The global IT robotic automation market” 3 2015 Deloitte Global CIO Survey About IPsoft IPsoft automates IT and business processes for enterprises across a wide range of industries through the use of digital labor. Through its portfolio of world leading autonomic and cognitive solutions it provides services that allow its clients to secure competitive advantage. Headquartered in New York City, IPsoft has 18 offices in 15 countries across the world and serves more than 500 of the world’s leading brands directly as well as more than half of the world’s largest IT services providers. About Deloitte Consulting LLP Deloitte helps organizations grow their businesses and enhance value by identifying actionable insights. More than 35,000 professionals provide a broad range of capabilities across human capital, strategy and operations, innovation, and technology that are aligned to the particular needs of specific sectors, businesses and organizations. Deloitte provides clients with leading business insights that can help generate a tangible and measurable impact. Contact IPsoft Daniela Zuin, +001 212 708 5521 Marketing Director, IPsoft daniela.zuin@ipsoft.com Edelman for IPsoft Erin Pace, (312) 297-6900 Erin.Pace@edelman.com


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Opinion

The Commercializer of Cognitive Technology


Edwin Van Bommel left a plum job as a McKinsey Partner to turn IPsoft’s artificial intelligence technology into a big business. After 16 years at consulting firm..

The Commercializer of Cognitive Technology


Edwin Van Bommel left a plum job as a McKinsey Partner to turn IPsoft’s artificial intelligence technology into a big business. After 16 years at consulting firm McKinsey, Edwin Van Bommel felt it was time for a change. A door opened one day when he was on a flight to London from his home town in Amsterdam. There, he sat next to IPsoft’s head of Europe who told him about the development of Amelia, IPsoft’s virtual assistant that was being used in company call centers. Van Bommel immediately wanted to see Amelia in action. His colleagues showed him the technology and it was even more interesting than he expected. Thus began a dialogue with IPsoft that led to him to joining the New York-based company in January 2016 as its chief cognitive officer. “I have the potential to do transformation at a much larger scale than I could do as a partner at McKinsey,” he said. While founder and CEO Chetan Dube is responsible for leading IPsoft and developing its long term vision, Van Bommel is tasked with bringing Amelia to market around the world, developing applications that can transform the ways businesses operate across many industries. In this interview, Van Bommel discusses why he thinks Amelia is better than Siri, how she gets smarter and why people shouldn’t be afraid of our digital assistants. This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity. Was there a moment when a light bulb went off that sold you on joining IPsoft? What sold me on it was the whole humanization element of Amelia. You can actually talk in natural language and get a response that feels warmer than what your PC says. If we really crack this, the adoption rate will be so high. But the other side is training Amelia. It needs to be super easy. I always say my mother needs to be able to train Amelia like she was able to train me, right? What’s the difference between Amelia and the best known smart assistant, Apple’s Siri? The difference between a Siri and an Amelia is that you can really have a conversation with Amelia. Siri can put on my music, or can call my wife, but sort of there it stops. And now, with Viv, the Siri on steroids, you can order flowers, but you still cannot open a bank account. Amelia is better in the contextual understanding, and therefore can be more human. To give an example, if you ask Amelia, “Who are the New York Yankees?” she will answer, “It’s a baseball team.” Then you can ask, “Did they have a game last weekend?” And she will say yes. She’ll also probably say the score. But she understands “they,” is still the Yankees. Those are very simple examples. But we classify language so that we not only can handle synonyms, but we also can handle it on a different level. Amelia’s primary use right now is customer service, but what do you see as future uses for her? You can teach Amelia all kinds of things. She can be a mortgage broker. She can be a service desk. Now, to do that, she needs to be very effective. She needs to work with all kinds of systems and APIs to do her job. But in the future, Amelia will not even use these anymore, because, in some cases, there will be other bots and she will just talk human language with the bots. That’s the next level. Bots talking to bots. So not necessarily machine language, but actual conversation? Yes. That’s, on one hand, scary. On the other hand, it’s much more transparent, because now you actually don’t know what’s all going on in all these system interfaces, because they’re undercover. But, if bots are having conversations, a human actually can see what these bots are discussing. It has a big benefit. So how human can Amelia get? We are actually looking at that now. How can we humanize Amelia even further? Should she be able to tell jokes? Should she maybe have a favorite band? We don’t know. For me, the hardest part is: How can we make it as enjoyable as possible, so that people actually say, “Oh, this is the Amelia channel; I will use it”? What does success look like? My core goal is that we come up with applications for Amelia where she’s really transformational, and really has impact. And the number-one KPI for me, for my department, is user experience or customer experience How do you handle the fear that seems to come along with this kind of technology? I’m certainly a digital optimist. But I truly think that it will change industries. Why would you outsource jobs offshore when you can have a computer running in the U.S. doing the same job for you? First-line support people will be replaced and businesses need to make sure that these people can do other things. In the end it’s better, because we will have more people available to become teachers again and we can free up doctors from mundane tasks. The world can really become better.


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In The Media

The Guardian: Why Facebook and Microsoft say chatbots are the talk of the town


Software programmed to interact with humans is hot property in Silicon Valley, with potential benefits for businesses, consumers — even the bereaved Read more

The Guardian: Why Facebook and Microsoft say chatbots are the talk of the town


Software programmed to interact with humans is hot property in Silicon Valley, with potential benefits for businesses, consumers — even the bereaved Read more


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Opinion

Digital labor could unleash a creative revolution in the workplace


“Within ten years, regardless of your occupation, you will work alongside an artificial intelligence,” says Chetan Dube, president and chief executive of IPsoft,..

Digital labor could unleash a creative revolution in the workplace


“Within ten years, regardless of your occupation, you will work alongside an artificial intelligence,” says Chetan Dube, president and chief executive of IPsoft, whose automation technology is already used by more than 200 companies from the Fortune 1000. In 1998, Mr Dube left his role as a professor at New York University to found IPsoft and make this vision a reality. The world of work is finally catching up with him. McKinsey estimates that about 60 per cent of occupations could have 30 per cent or more of their constituent activities automated using currently demonstrated technology. The potential for automation varies between industries, but applies at every salary level. “Automation of knowledge work will be the megatrend of the 21st century,” says Mr Dube. Enter Amelia, a cognitive agent IPsoft describes as “your first digital employee.” Amelia can communicate in multiple languages. She can consume natural language training materials. She learns by observing interactions between colleagues and customers and even senses emotions. “There has been a lot of hype around cognitive automation technologies for four to five years,” says Shamus Rae, partner, and UK head of innovation and investments at KPMG. “Amelia is an example of the technology starting to deliver and to make the hype a reality.” London’s Enfield Council, which receives 100,000 website visits each month, just “hired” Amelia to help process permit and licence applications via the site. You may soon meet Amelia processing your insurance claim, offering financial advice in your bank or working at your company’s IT help desk. Accenture created an entire Amelia practice this year. Paul Daugherty, chief technology officer at Accenture, explains: “We created the Accenture Amelia practice to help clients transform their business and operations, and take an important step forward in advancing the business potential of artificial intelligence.” Deloitte, meanwhile, also announced an alliance with IPsoft. “There is very little doubt that the AI-cognitive space is real,” says Ranjit Bawa, cloud and infrastructure lead and principal at Deloitte Consulting. “We are helping many of our clients use the opportunity to truly transform their business operating model versus going after point solutions that automate a sub-optimal process. Cognitive platforms such as Amelia can be powerful in helping articulate the ‘art of the possible’,” he says. The arrival of artificial intelligence (AI) in the workplace appears inevitable. It’s not a question of whether companies should introduce AI, but how quickly they will go out of business if they don’t. Accenture’s Technology Vision 2016 report, which polled 3,100 business and IT executives, found that 70 per cent of respondents are making significantly more investments in AI-related technologies than two years ago. Those executives will have to learn how to staff, manage and lead increasingly automated organisations. Professor Tom Davenport, author of Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers in the Age of Smart Machines, says: “There may be a managerial division of labour between those who can manage humans with empathy and inspiration, and those who manage machines on which empathy would be wasted. “But the leaders of machines need to understand fundamentally how they work, when they need to be improved and when they are no longer useful. Knowing when to shut the machines down is a really important skill.” Digital labor has the potential to increase drastically productivity. So should workers fear a future of man versus machine? “Be in no doubt that this is another industrial revolution,” says Mr Dube. “Many tasks we perform today will be taken up by digital employees. The true revolution, however, is not in replacing human workers, but fundamentally changing the roles they carry out to create new sources of value.” Leaders in the field agree, envisaging a future of man plus machine, rather than man versus machine. “I believe it is very useful to adopt a philosophy of augmentation, rather than automation, from the beginning,” says Professor Davenport. “That assures humans they won’t be replaced just because of a machine and gives them the confidence to explore new ways to work alongside machines.” Mr Daugherty agrees: “AI needs to be designed with people in mind to not only do things differently, but also do different things in unison with humans.” Creativity is among the most difficult of human capabilities to automate. Yet just 4 per cent of work activities across the US economy require creativity at a median human level of performance. Delegating routine tasks to cognitive technology could help unleash that dormant creativity. An AI colleague can become your wingman. AI can allow you to focus on what’s enjoyable, strategic and creative about your work. Human beings have always built technology to augment their physical and mental capabilities. From the earliest Stone Age tools to the arrival of the internet, technology has effectively given us superhuman powers. AI-powered automation may also steer us towards being superhuman in a different sense, to focus on developing our most human capabilities from creativity to emotional intelligence. Mr Rae comments: “If you want to know what to tell your children, make sure they can absolutely be creative and have not been industrialised too much by the education system.” A true collaboration between man and machine, combining the strengths of both, could result in a revolution in human creativity. “A human mind is a terrible thing to waste,” Mr Dube concludes. “It should be doing things that are much more creative and much more rewarding.”


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Events

The Future of Intelligent Operations


A quantum shift in IT management is arriving soon. This summer, IPsoft opened the Autonomics Center, our New York innovation and operations hub for IT..

The Future of Intelligent Operations


future_intelligent_operations

A quantum shift in IT management is arriving soon.
This summer, IPsoft opened the Autonomics Center, our New York innovation and operations hub for IT infrastructure. At our launch event, we explored the future of intelligent operations and previewed our new cognitive platform, Apollo. Register to view the videos from our launch event:
Advent of the AutoNOC
and a new future for IT Management
future_intelligent_operationsIPsoft CEO Chetan Dube describes our bold vision for the future. He discusses Apollo, IPsoft's soon to be launched cognitive IT management platform with an autonomic backbone powered by algorithms. He explores the "Uberization" of IT operations — the massive digital disruption on the horizon — and the importance of a digital first strategy.



 
Apollo: A New Cognitive IT Management Platform
future_intelligent_operationsBen Case, Cognitive Solutions Architect at IPsoft, previews the Apollo platform, demonstrating how Apollo integrates IPsoft's cognitive agent, Amelia. He showcases how the platform can assist business users with common problems while helping human engineers manage and improve performance of an environment.



 
Reshaping IT Operations in the era of IoT
future_intelligent_operationsJean Hill, Managing Director at Alvarez and Marsal, provides the latest update in accelerating adoption of IT automation. She traces technology trends over the past 50 years, exploring the forces of change that are transforming IT and offering insight into how organizations and leadership can not only survive but thrive in the new cognitive era.



 
Redefining the CIO role in the era of automated operations
future_intelligent_operationsAn esteemed panel of senior executives from top Fortune 500 companies, moderated by with ISG partner Steve Hall, explore the changing nature of their roles in the autonomic era. In a lively discussion, the IT leaders describe their greatest technology challenges and explain how autonomics, cognitive computing and artificial intelligence are improving their businesses.


 
Register to view the event videos


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